Qingdao myjian dog treats

  • dog food treats

    dog food treat

    1. Raw Eggs
    For a lot of year’s we’ve been conditioned to fear raw eggs, but did you know that when eaten with their shells, eggs are nearly a complete source of nutrition for your dog? Eggs are a great source of: selenium, iron, vitamin A, riboflavin, fatty acids, vitamin B12, and folate.

    Although eggs cannot be used as your dog’s main source of nutrition, most dogs are fine consuming them a few times a week. And remember to feed them raw if you can as cooking will destroy many of the egg’s nutrients.

    If you can’t feed bone to your dog for some reason, drying and grinding egg shells in a coffee grinder is a great way for your dog to get important minerals like calcium in a homemade diet. If you do this, be sure to buy your eggs from an organic farmer. Large commercial brands spray egg shells with a chemical to make them shiny to entice us to buy them in the supermarket. You don’t want your dog consuming those chemicals.

    Recommended Dose: With any new food item, try small amounts to start and work your way up to a full dose. Try replacing a portion of your dog’s meal with a raw egg 2-3 times a week. If you have a small dog, try a quail egg!

    Best Brand Options: Local, organic, free range and naturally fed (my mom’s chickens eat bugs and food scraps as well as a little grain) is the very best option. If you can’t source or afford those eggs, purchase as close as you can in your supermarket. Costco has free range, organic eggs for example. I wouldn’t feed the shells from these eggs, however.

     

    2. Goat’s Milk
    Goat’s milk is know as the “universal milk” and is the most digestible milk available due to the small size of its molecules. If your dog has issues with bovine dairy, goat’s milk is another option that tends to be more hypoallergenic and better tolerated than cow’s milk.

    Because raw goat’s milk has naturally occurring probiotics, it’s has all the benefits that probiotics offer in a very easy to absorb form. If your dog has digestive issues, give goat’s milk a try! Goat’s milk is also another great way to hydrate your pet!

    Recommended Dose: With any new food item, try small amounts to start and work your way up to a full dose.

     

    Up to 20 LBS pet: 1-2 oz per day
    20 – 40 LBS pet: 2-4 oz per day
    40 – 60 LBS pet: 4-6 oz per day
    60 – 80 LBS pet: 6-8 oz per day
    Over 80 LBS pet: 8-10 oz per day

    Best Brand Options: Look for goat’s milk from animals that have been naturally raised, preferably raw and organic. Primal Pet Foods has a raw goat’s milk that can be found in the freezer section of higher end pet food stores. Their milk is humanely sourced from free range goats without the use of hormones or antibiotics. Their goat’s milk also has added turmeric, cinnamon, and ginger.

    3. Kefir
    Kefir, otherwise known as the “grain of life” has so many health benefits. Many people compare kefir to yogurt because they look similar, but kefir is like yogurt on steroids! Kefir is a fermented food that’s loaded with probiotics and beneficial yeasts (30 different strains!) that help ward off the pathogenic yeast and bacteria.

    If your dog is on a dry food diet, their food could contain up to 70% carbohydrates!! Carbohydrates wreak havoc on the body because they are essentially fuel for pathogenic yeast. If your dog is smelly, itchy, losing fur, or has frequent ear infections, they may have an issue with yeast overgrowth.

    If your dog has recently undergone extra stress (like staying in a kennel) or has taken medication, especially antibiotics, you need to add a probiotic like kefir immediately! (I would also add a pre/probiotic supplement)

    Here is a short list of the benefits to supplementing with kefir: anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, helps with candidiasis, IBD, allergies, and it’s filled with beneficial vitamins and minerals.

    Kefir is traditionally prepared with cow’s milk, but it is available with sheep or goat’s milk – it’s just harder to find. It also exists in dairy-free versions using coconut or almond milk, but again, a little trickier to find.

    Recommended Dose: With any new food item, try small amounts to start and work your way up to a full dose.

     

    Up to 20 LBS pet: 1-2 oz per day
    20 – 40 LBS pet: 2-4 oz per day
    40 – 60 LBS pet: 4-6 oz per day
    60 – 80 LBS pet: 6-8 oz per day
    Over 80 LBS pet: 8-10 oz per day

    Best Brand Options: I use Open Farm’s raw, organic kefir. It’s made from organic, raw cow’s milk and is certified humane. You can find it in the freezer section of your local, high-end pet food store. You can also find kefir in grocery stores in the dairy or natural food sections. As with any food, try and use sources that are organic, gmo free, antibiotic and hormone free.

    Although I have never attempted this, you can make you own kefir! Since my mom has Jersey cows, I might give it a go! You can buy kefir cultures in health food stores or online. Culture’s for Health has some great options!

Join our newsletter

Volutpat vel turpis nulla lorem sed semper. Aliquam sagittis sem libero viverra vehicula nullam ut nisl.

Leave A Comment